It is currently Tue Jan 16, 2018 3:03 pm Advanced search

New Boat: St. Tropez!

Post your technical questions directly related to the Rivaforum here. We will do our best to respond to your questions in a timely manner.

Moderators: Eric T., Don Ayers, martinfeletto, RonSchultz

New Boat: St. Tropez!

Postby Rickyrama » Wed Oct 30, 2013 11:05 am

Hi guys I'm very happy and proud to tell you that, after few months of research, I bought my first Riva!! :D A beautiful white St. Tropez of 1986, so one of the last products. The boat looks great, the interior upholstery is original and conserved very good, the paint is perfect and the engines were always checked. Now is there anyone who can tell me the secrets, strengths and weakness of the boat in daily use? Or something that is not on the books? I love this boat since I was a child but is very rare and there aren't many informations. Thank you.

Ricky.
Rickyrama
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:35 am
Location: Italy

Re: New Boat: St. Tropez!

Postby Don Ayers » Sat Nov 02, 2013 6:29 pm

Ricky;


Congrats to you!!!

I do not own one but one of the members here does. Marty Feletto from California does and I have been on it several times.

He should chime in and give you the scoop.

Regards
Don Ayers
Oklahoma
1959 Ariston 266
User avatar
Don Ayers
 
Posts: 308
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 4:18 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: New Boat: St. Tropez!

Postby Eric T. » Sun Nov 03, 2013 2:07 am

The secret to ANY 25 + year old boat... Make it function well.

Have the carburetors rebuilt by a Specialist in those carburetors (Rochester Quadrajet).

If you cannot verify that the fuel pumps have been replaced recently.... Replace both.

Add a good fuel/water separation fuel filter on both fuel supply lines to the engines.

Make sure that the Distributor is rebuilt ... or better yet, install a new Mallory electronic Distributor (spinterogeno) and coil with new ignition wires (cavo) and new spark plugs (candele) and a new ignition coil (bobbina)

Pull out the propeller shaft (asse d elica) and make sure that it is straight and not bent... along with the coupler (flanga).

Take the propellers (elica) to a good propeller shop and have them restored and balanced.

Make sure that the propeller shaft rubber bearings are not worn.. replace them if they are.

Re-Align the engines to the propeller shaft... after many years of use, they will have settled a bit on the mounts and the alignment will be incorrect.

Make sure that you have a good electrical system with fresh batteries, good cables and connections and good wiring.

Service the thermostat to ensure proper function.

Remove and replace the oil in the Transmission, the Drive and the engine. Use only the recommended fluids to replace them with... Make sure that the engine oil has ZDDP in it... buy additive if not.

All of this is VERY good money spent... A "motor boat" without a functioning motor is really not good for much... If you are using your boat on vacation... that this the worst time to have an issue.




.
User avatar
Eric T.
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 10:40 am

Re: New Boat: St. Tropez!

Postby martinfeletto » Sun Nov 03, 2013 11:01 am

Yes - I own a 1981 St Tropez and enjoy the boat tremendously. Eric has mentioned a very good mechanical checklist to go through - perhaps over time.

In addition there are a couple of things about St Tropez's that will probably be happening or will happen - don't worry about them.

First - all of the foam insulation that is on the bottom of the engine hatches, inside the engine bay, and just kind of all around back there will begin to crumble over time. Its underneath the black drilled vinyl. You will see lots of small black foam particles laying around everywhere, like dust. Don't worry - clean it up and eventually replace it all if possible. You will see evidence of this in the flame arrestors over the carbs where it will be sucking in this material. Keep them clean as much as possible from this stuff.

Likely over time the top of the dash will crack above the glove box - again normal. Nothing to worry about.

There are 4 watertight compartments in the boat. The front where the anchor is is self bailing. Next is under the rear seat inside the lift-up compartment. You should check the bilge pump operation there. There is a third in the engine bay which is again a watertight compartment. This is the most important. #2 and this one are operated from the control panel below the throttles. Lastly - back by the gas tanks - is another watertight compartment - check the bilge pump there which likely is only an automatic operation pump.

One last mechanical thing that gets ignored is the shift and throttle cables. Inspect them and replace as needed.

The boat has a unique wedge bottom design that allows it to handle rough water so well. It though does not have any real "entry" up front. As such it can be difficult to turn at times. Throttle back, let the front dig in a bit, then use the throttles to turn.

They are great boats - enjoy!!

Marty
martinfeletto
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 8:24 am

Re: New Boat: St. Tropez!

Postby Eric T. » Sun Nov 03, 2013 3:53 pm

Learning new stuff every day... Thanks Marty for the great post!!

I never knew that about the insulation, but I've seen it stuck to the flame arrestors of quite a few St. Tropez boats.




.
User avatar
Eric T.
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 10:40 am

Re: New Boat: St. Tropez!

Postby Rickyrama » Wed Nov 13, 2013 11:40 am

So, the first thing is a big thank to all, this is a fantastic forum! The engines had a total check before I bought the boat, so the fuel pumps, and the disbrutors are new, while both the propeller shaft were checked and were good, and electric system was refit a couple of years ago. I change the propellers because weren't perfect like the rest of the boat. Shift and throttle cables are ok, I checked all the bilge, and I have to refit only one. For the insulation, this is probably the only problem because it isn't in excellent condition, in I have to decide if change now or in the future (I know that many St. Tropez remove the insulation, is good this operation?). Also the glasses (very expensive) were changed in the beginning of 2012!! I'm so happy because the price of the boat was very low, so I was afraid there were problems!

The last thing that I don't like so much for esthetic is the electric anchor, isn't a big problem to remove it, but all people have told me that is very helpful! Marty what is your opinion?

Thank you a lot, Ricky.
Rickyrama
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:35 am
Location: Italy

Re: New Boat: St. Tropez!

Postby martinfeletto » Thu Nov 21, 2013 12:32 pm

Hi Ricky - my boat does not have the electric anchor so I don't know how big of a job it is to remove it - if you are anchoring a lot it Is probably a convenient thing to have.

The insulation will continue to degrade - it is more of a cosmetic issue than mechanical as long as you keep the flame arrestors clean. I removed mine from the hatches and wherever else I could get at it. I replaced under the hatches with a dense foam material - glued on - at it seems fine. I don't think you need to worry about the insulation until you decide to do other things to the boat.

Marty
martinfeletto
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 8:24 am


Return to Rivaforum Support

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest